Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi

“You must always ask yourself, whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story, too.”

Half-sisters Effia and Esi are born in (what is today) Ghana, in the 18th century. The half-sisters are unknown to one another. Their lives create the two divergent paths we follow, as debut author Yaa Gyasi navigates between Africa and the US, and from the mid-18th C. through to present day. Effia’s family line remains in Africa (until the 2000s) and endures tribal wars, colonialism, missionaries trying to bring Christianity to the continent, and the struggle for independence. Esi’s family line is in America, the consequence of her capture by slavers in the mid-1700s. Esi’s descendants struggle and fight through slavery, the Jim Crow south, the civil rights movement, and the war on drugs. Along with the epic historical sweep of the story, the social commentary is an important part of the book, and Gyasi viscerally presents the deeply rooted damages and vileness that has continued for hundreds of years because of slavery. In any discussions or work on race, class, and reparations in the US, this book is a strong and important statement.

2117741Gyasi is quite clever with how she has structured this book – it is an interesting approach to an epic story. Though it did cause me a bit of frustration while reading – because this is such an emotional book and we are not always given conclusions for characters to whom we have become attached. (Not that I need tidy endings at all… I just felt like I was missing out on some of the arcs as characters from the next generation came up to take over from their predecessors.) While I suppose it shouldn’t matter, I feel as though I would have fared a bit better with the structure coming into this book thinking of it as connected stories, over a novel. As we move through the generations, reading the chapters felt very much like experiencing vignettes, moments captured in time. Gyasi’s writing is so strong and evocative; I was left with very vivid images and feelings as I read. So this vignette approach worked for me even though I felt I floundered a bit with the continuity. Honestly, I would have read a meaty 800-page epic from Gyasi quite contentedly, and I would have appreciated a bit more time with each of her characters. 🙂

Concerning tidy endings…  this was a (very) small issue for me in Homegoing as it did feel a bit too neat. I just didn’t love how it ended, after such a strong and affecting experience with the rest of the story. But Gyasi’s talent is hugely evident, this is a truly impressive and powerful debut, and I will definitely read whatever she publishes next. I highly recommend this wonderful book.

 

Many thanks to Penguin Random House Canada for an e-pub review copy through NetGalley.